Didacticiel sur Iptables, version 1.2.0


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XXIX. Example scripts code-base

XXIX-A. Example rc.firewall script

 
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#!/bin/sh
#
# rc.firewall - Initial SIMPLE IP Firewall script for Linux 2.4.x and iptables
#
# Copyright (C) 2001  Oskar Andreasson <bluefluxATkoffeinDOTnet>
#
# This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation; version 2 of the License.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program or from the site that you downloaded it
# from; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple
# Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307   USA
#
 
###########################################################################
#
# 1. Configuration options.
#
 
#
# 1.1 Internet Configuration.
#
 
INET_IP="194.236.50.155"
INET_IFACE="eth0"
INET_BROADCAST="194.236.50.255"
 
#
# 1.1.1 DHCP
#
 
#
# 1.1.2 PPPoE
#
 
#
# 1.2 Local Area Network configuration.
#
# your LAN's IP range and localhost IP. /24 means to only use the first 24
# bits of the 32 bit IP address. the same as netmask 255.255.255.0
#
 
LAN_IP="192.168.0.2"
LAN_IP_RANGE="192.168.0.0/16"
LAN_IFACE="eth1"
 
#
# 1.3 DMZ Configuration.
#
 
#
# 1.4 Localhost Configuration.
#
 
LO_IFACE="lo"
LO_IP="127.0.0.1"
 
#
# 1.5 IPTables Configuration.
#
 
IPTABLES="/usr/sbin/iptables"
 
#
# 1.6 Other Configuration.
#
 
###########################################################################
#
# 2. Module loading.
#
 
#
# Needed to initially load modules
#
 
/sbin/depmod -a
 
#
# 2.1 Required modules
#
 
/sbin/modprobe ip_tables
/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack
/sbin/modprobe iptable_filter
/sbin/modprobe iptable_mangle
/sbin/modprobe iptable_nat
/sbin/modprobe ipt_LOG
/sbin/modprobe ipt_limit
/sbin/modprobe ipt_state
 
#
# 2.2 Non-Required modules
#
 
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_owner
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_REJECT
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_MASQUERADE
#/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack_ftp
#/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack_irc
#/sbin/modprobe ip_nat_ftp
#/sbin/modprobe ip_nat_irc
 
###########################################################################
#
# 3. /proc set up.
#
 
#
# 3.1 Required proc configuration
#
 
echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
 
#
# 3.2 Non-Required proc configuration
#
 
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/rp_filter
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/proxy_arp
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr
 
###########################################################################
#
# 4. rules set up.
#
 
######
# 4.1 Filter table
#
 
#
# 4.1.1 Set policies
#
 
$IPTABLES -P INPUT DROP
$IPTABLES -P OUTPUT DROP
$IPTABLES -P FORWARD DROP
 
#
# 4.1.2 Create userspecified chains
#
 
#
# Create chain for bad tcp packets
#
 
$IPTABLES -N bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Create separate chains for ICMP, TCP and UDP to traverse
#
 
$IPTABLES -N allowed
$IPTABLES -N tcp_packets
$IPTABLES -N udp_packets
$IPTABLES -N icmp_packets
 
#
# 4.1.3 Create content in userspecified chains
#
 
#
# bad_tcp_packets chain
#
 
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,ACK SYN,ACK \
-m state --state NEW -j REJECT --reject-with tcp-reset 
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp ! --syn -m state --state NEW -j LOG \
--log-prefix "New not syn:"
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp ! --syn -m state --state NEW -j DROP
 
#
# allowed chain
#
 
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP --syn -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP -j DROP
 
#
# TCP rules
#
 
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 21 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 22 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 80 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 113 -j allowed
 
#
# UDP ports
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --destination-port 53 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --destination-port 123 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --destination-port 2074 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --destination-port 4000 -j ACCEPT
 
#
# In Microsoft Networks you will be swamped by broadcasts. These lines 
# will prevent them from showing up in the logs.
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -d $INET_BROADCAST \
#--destination-port 135:139 -j DROP
 
#
# If we get DHCP requests from the Outside of our network, our logs will 
# be swamped as well. This rule will block them from getting logged.
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -d 255.255.255.255 \
#--destination-port 67:68 -j DROP
 
#
# ICMP rules
#
 
$IPTABLES -A icmp_packets -p ICMP -s 0/0 --icmp-type 8 -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A icmp_packets -p ICMP -s 0/0 --icmp-type 11 -j ACCEPT
 
#
# 4.1.4 INPUT chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Rules for special networks not part of the Internet
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LAN_IFACE -s $LAN_IP_RANGE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $LO_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $LAN_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $INET_IP -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Special rule for DHCP requests from LAN, which are not caught properly
# otherwise.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p UDP -i $LAN_IFACE --dport 67 --sport 68 -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Rules for incoming packets from the internet.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -d $INET_IP -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED \
-j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p TCP -i $INET_IFACE -j tcp_packets
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -j udp_packets
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ICMP -i $INET_IFACE -j icmp_packets
 
#
# If you have a Microsoft Network on the outside of your firewall, you may 
# also get flooded by Multicasts. We drop them so we do not get flooded by 
# logs
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $INET_IFACE -d 224.0.0.0/8 -j DROP
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT INPUT packet died: "
 
#
# 4.1.5 FORWARD chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Accept the packets we actually want to forward
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $LAN_IFACE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT FORWARD packet died: "
 
#
# 4.1.6 OUTPUT chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Special OUTPUT rules to decide which IP's to allow.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $LO_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $LAN_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $INET_IP -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT OUTPUT packet died: "
 
######
# 4.2 nat table
#
 
#
# 4.2.1 Set policies
#
 
#
# 4.2.2 Create user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.2.3 Create content in user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.2.4 PREROUTING chain
#
 
#
# 4.2.5 POSTROUTING chain
#
 
#
# Enable simple IP Forwarding and Network Address Translation
#
 
$IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $INET_IFACE -j SNAT --to-source $INET_IP
 
#
# 4.2.6 OUTPUT chain
#
 
######
# 4.3 mangle table
#
 
#
# 4.3.1 Set policies
#
 
#
# 4.3.2 Create user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.3.3 Create content in user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.3.4 PREROUTING chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.5 INPUT chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.6 FORWARD chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.7 OUTPUT chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.8 POSTROUTING chain
#
 
 

XXIX-B. Example rc.DMZ.firewall script

 
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#!/bin/sh
#
# rc.DMZ.firewall - DMZ IP Firewall script for Linux 2.4.x and iptables
#
# Copyright (C) 2001  Oskar Andreasson <bluefluxATkoffeinDOTnet>
#
# This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation; version 2 of the License.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program or from the site that you downloaded it
# from; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple
# Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307   USA
#
 
###########################################################################
#
# 1. Configuration options.
#
 
#
# 1.1 Internet Configuration.
#
 
INET_IP="194.236.50.152"
HTTP_IP="194.236.50.153"
DNS_IP="194.236.50.154"
INET_IFACE="eth0"
 
#
# 1.1.1 DHCP
#
 
#
# 1.1.2 PPPoE
#
 
#
# 1.2 Local Area Network configuration.
#
# your LAN's IP range and localhost IP. /24 means to only use the first 24
# bits of the 32 bit IP address. the same as netmask 255.255.255.0
#
 
LAN_IP="192.168.0.1"
LAN_IFACE="eth1"
 
#
# 1.3 DMZ Configuration.
#
 
DMZ_HTTP_IP="192.168.1.2"
DMZ_DNS_IP="192.168.1.3"
DMZ_IP="192.168.1.1"
DMZ_IFACE="eth2"
 
#
# 1.4 Localhost Configuration.
#
 
LO_IFACE="lo"
LO_IP="127.0.0.1"
 
#
# 1.5 IPTables Configuration.
#
 
IPTABLES="/usr/sbin/iptables"
 
#
# 1.6 Other Configuration.
#
 
###########################################################################
#
# 2. Module loading.
#
 
#
# Needed to initially load modules
#
/sbin/depmod -a
 
 
 
#
# 2.1 Required modules
#
 
/sbin/modprobe ip_tables
/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack
/sbin/modprobe iptable_filter
/sbin/modprobe iptable_mangle
/sbin/modprobe iptable_nat
/sbin/modprobe ipt_LOG
/sbin/modprobe ipt_limit
/sbin/modprobe ipt_state
 
#
# 2.2 Non-Required modules
#
 
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_owner
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_REJECT
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_MASQUERADE
#/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack_ftp
#/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack_irc
#/sbin/modprobe ip_nat_ftp
#/sbin/modprobe ip_nat_irc
 
###########################################################################
#
# 3. /proc set up.
#
 
#
# 3.1 Required proc configuration
#
 
echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
 
#
# 3.2 Non-Required proc configuration
#
 
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/rp_filter
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/proxy_arp
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr
 
###########################################################################
#
# 4. rules set up.
#
 
######
# 4.1 Filter table
#
 
#
# 4.1.1 Set policies
#
 
$IPTABLES -P INPUT DROP
$IPTABLES -P OUTPUT DROP
$IPTABLES -P FORWARD DROP
 
#
# 4.1.2 Create userspecified chains
#
 
#
# Create chain for bad tcp packets
#
 
$IPTABLES -N bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Create separate chains for ICMP, TCP and UDP to traverse
#
 
$IPTABLES -N allowed
$IPTABLES -N icmp_packets
 
#
# 4.1.3 Create content in userspecified chains
#
 
#
# bad_tcp_packets chain
#
 
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,ACK SYN,ACK \
-m state --state NEW -j REJECT --reject-with tcp-reset
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp ! --syn -m state --state NEW -j LOG \
--log-prefix "New not syn:"
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp ! --syn -m state --state NEW -j DROP
 
#
# allowed chain
#
 
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP --syn -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP -j DROP
 
#
# ICMP rules
#
 
# Changed rules totally
$IPTABLES -A icmp_packets -p ICMP -s 0/0 --icmp-type 8 -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A icmp_packets -p ICMP -s 0/0 --icmp-type 11 -j ACCEPT
 
#
# 4.1.4 INPUT chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Packets from the Internet to this box
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ICMP -i $INET_IFACE -j icmp_packets
 
#
# Packets from LAN, DMZ or LOCALHOST
#
 
#
# From DMZ Interface to DMZ firewall IP
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $DMZ_IFACE -d $DMZ_IP -j ACCEPT
 
#
# From LAN Interface to LAN firewall IP
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LAN_IFACE -d $LAN_IP -j ACCEPT
 
#
# From Localhost interface to Localhost IP's
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $LO_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $LAN_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $INET_IP -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Special rule for DHCP requests from LAN, which are not caught properly
# otherwise.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p UDP -i $LAN_IFACE --dport 67 --sport 68 -j ACCEPT
 
#
# All established and related packets incoming from the internet to the
# firewall
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -d $INET_IP -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED \
-j ACCEPT
 
#
# In Microsoft Networks you will be swamped by broadcasts. These lines
# will prevent them from showing up in the logs.
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -d $INET_BROADCAST \
#--destination-port 135:139 -j DROP
 
#
# If we get DHCP requests from the Outside of our network, our logs will
# be swamped as well. This rule will block them from getting logged.
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -d 255.255.255.255 \
#--destination-port 67:68 -j DROP
 
#
# If you have a Microsoft Network on the outside of your firewall, you may
# also get flooded by Multicasts. We drop them so we do not get flooded by
# logs
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $INET_IFACE -d 224.0.0.0/8 -j DROP
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT INPUT packet died: "
 
#
# 4.1.5 FORWARD chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
 
#
# DMZ section
#
# General rules
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $DMZ_IFACE -o $INET_IFACE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $INET_IFACE -o $DMZ_IFACE -m state \
--state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $LAN_IFACE -o $DMZ_IFACE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $DMZ_IFACE -o $LAN_IFACE -m state \
--state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
 
#
# HTTP server
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p TCP -i $INET_IFACE -o $DMZ_IFACE -d $DMZ_HTTP_IP \
--dport 80 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p ICMP -i $INET_IFACE -o $DMZ_IFACE -d $DMZ_HTTP_IP \
-j icmp_packets
 
#
# DNS server
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p TCP -i $INET_IFACE -o $DMZ_IFACE -d $DMZ_DNS_IP \
--dport 53 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -o $DMZ_IFACE -d $DMZ_DNS_IP \
--dport 53 -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p ICMP -i $INET_IFACE -o $DMZ_IFACE -d $DMZ_DNS_IP \
-j icmp_packets
 
#
# LAN section
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $LAN_IFACE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT FORWARD packet died: "
 
#
# 4.1.6 OUTPUT chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Special OUTPUT rules to decide which IP's to allow.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $LO_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $LAN_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $INET_IP -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT OUTPUT packet died: "
 
######
# 4.2 nat table
#
 
#
# 4.2.1 Set policies
#
 
#
# 4.2.2 Create user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.2.3 Create content in user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.2.4 PREROUTING chain
#
 
$IPTABLES -t nat -A PREROUTING -p TCP -i $INET_IFACE -d $HTTP_IP --dport 80 \
-j DNAT --to-destination $DMZ_HTTP_IP
$IPTABLES -t nat -A PREROUTING -p TCP -i $INET_IFACE -d $DNS_IP --dport 53 \
-j DNAT --to-destination $DMZ_DNS_IP
$IPTABLES -t nat -A PREROUTING -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -d $DNS_IP --dport 53 \
-j DNAT --to-destination $DMZ_DNS_IP
 
#
# 4.2.5 POSTROUTING chain
#
 
#
# Enable simple IP Forwarding and Network Address Translation
#
 
$IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $INET_IFACE -j SNAT --to-source $INET_IP
 
#
# 4.2.6 OUTPUT chain
#
 
######
# 4.3 mangle table
#
 
#
# 4.3.1 Set policies
#
 
#
# 4.3.2 Create user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.3.3 Create content in user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.3.4 PREROUTING chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.5 INPUT chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.6 FORWARD chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.7 OUTPUT chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.8 POSTROUTING chain
#
 

XXIX-C. Example rc.UTIN.firewall script

 
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#!/bin/sh
#
# rc.UTIN.firewall - UTIN Firewall script for Linux 2.4.x and iptables
#
# Copyright (C) 2001  Oskar Andreasson <bluefluxATkoffeinDOTnet>
#
# This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation; version 2 of the License.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program or from the site that you downloaded it
# from; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple
# Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307   USA
#
 
###########################################################################
#
# 1. Configuration options.
#
 
#
# 1.1 Internet Configuration.
#
 
INET_IP="194.236.50.155"
INET_IFACE="eth0"
INET_BROADCAST="194.236.50.255"
 
#
# 1.1.1 DHCP
#
 
#
# 1.1.2 PPPoE
#
 
#
# 1.2 Local Area Network configuration.
#
# your LAN's IP range and localhost IP. /24 means to only use the first 24
# bits of the 32 bit IP address. the same as netmask 255.255.255.0
#
 
LAN_IP="192.168.0.2"
LAN_IP_RANGE="192.168.0.0/16"
LAN_IFACE="eth1"
 
#
# 1.3 DMZ Configuration.
#
 
#
# 1.4 Localhost Configuration.
#
 
LO_IFACE="lo"
LO_IP="127.0.0.1"
 
#
# 1.5 IPTables Configuration.
#
 
IPTABLES="/usr/sbin/iptables"
 
#
# 1.6 Other Configuration.
#
 
###########################################################################
#
# 2. Module loading.
#
 
#
# Needed to initially load modules
#
 
/sbin/depmod -a
 
#
# 2.1 Required modules
#
 
/sbin/modprobe ip_tables
/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack
/sbin/modprobe iptable_filter
/sbin/modprobe iptable_mangle
/sbin/modprobe iptable_nat
/sbin/modprobe ipt_LOG
/sbin/modprobe ipt_limit
/sbin/modprobe ipt_state
 
#
# 2.2 Non-Required modules
#
 
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_owner
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_REJECT
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_MASQUERADE
#/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack_ftp
#/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack_irc
#/sbin/modprobe ip_nat_ftp
#/sbin/modprobe ip_nat_irc
 
###########################################################################
#
# 3. /proc set up.
#
 
#
# 3.1 Required proc configuration
#
 
echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
 
#
# 3.2 Non-Required proc configuration
#
 
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/rp_filter
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/proxy_arp
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr
 
###########################################################################
#
# 4. rules set up.
#
 
######
# 4.1 Filter table
#
 
#
# 4.1.1 Set policies
#
 
$IPTABLES -P INPUT DROP
$IPTABLES -P OUTPUT DROP
$IPTABLES -P FORWARD DROP
 
#
# 4.1.2 Create userspecified chains
#
 
#
# Create chain for bad tcp packets
#
 
$IPTABLES -N bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Create separate chains for ICMP, TCP and UDP to traverse
#
 
$IPTABLES -N allowed
$IPTABLES -N tcp_packets
$IPTABLES -N udp_packets
$IPTABLES -N icmp_packets
 
#
# 4.1.3 Create content in userspecified chains
#
 
#
# bad_tcp_packets chain
#
 
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,ACK SYN,ACK \
-m state --state NEW -j REJECT --reject-with tcp-reset
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp ! --syn -m state --state NEW -j LOG \
--log-prefix "New not syn:"
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp ! --syn -m state --state NEW -j DROP
 
#
# allowed chain
#
 
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP --syn -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP -j DROP
 
#
# TCP rules
#
 
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 21 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 22 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 80 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 113 -j allowed
 
#
# UDP ports
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --source-port 53 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --source-port 123 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --source-port 2074 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --source-port 4000 -j ACCEPT
 
#
# In Microsoft Networks you will be swamped by broadcasts. These lines
# will prevent them from showing up in the logs.
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -d $INET_BROADCAST \
#--destination-port 135:139 -j DROP
 
#
# If we get DHCP requests from the Outside of our network, our logs will
# be swamped as well. This rule will block them from getting logged.
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -d 255.255.255.255 \
#--destination-port 67:68 -j DROP
 
#
# ICMP rules
#
 
$IPTABLES -A icmp_packets -p ICMP -s 0/0 --icmp-type 8 -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A icmp_packets -p ICMP -s 0/0 --icmp-type 11 -j ACCEPT
 
#
# 4.1.4 INPUT chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Rules for special networks not part of the Internet
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $LO_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $LAN_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -s $INET_IP -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Rules for incoming packets from anywhere.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -d $INET_IP -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED \
-j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p TCP -j tcp_packets
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p UDP -j udp_packets
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ICMP -j icmp_packets
 
#
# If you have a Microsoft Network on the outside of your firewall, you may
# also get flooded by Multicasts. We drop them so we do not get flooded by
# logs
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $INET_IFACE -d 224.0.0.0/8 -j DROP
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT INPUT packet died: "
 
#
# 4.1.5 FORWARD chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Accept the packets we actually want to forward
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p tcp --dport 21 -i $LAN_IFACE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p tcp --dport 80 -i $LAN_IFACE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p tcp --dport 110 -i $LAN_IFACE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT FORWARD packet died: "
 
#
# 4.1.6 OUTPUT chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Special OUTPUT rules to decide which IP's to allow.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $LO_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $LAN_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $INET_IP -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT OUTPUT packet died: "
 
######
# 4.2 nat table
#
 
#
# 4.2.1 Set policies
#
 
#
# 4.2.2 Create user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.2.3 Create content in user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.2.4 PREROUTING chain
#
 
#
# 4.2.5 POSTROUTING chain
#
 
#
# Enable simple IP Forwarding and Network Address Translation
#
 
$IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $INET_IFACE -j SNAT --to-source $INET_IP
 
#
# 4.2.6 OUTPUT chain
#
 
######
# 4.3 mangle table
#
 
#
# 4.3.1 Set policies
#
 
#
# 4.3.2 Create user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.3.3 Create content in user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.3.4 PREROUTING chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.5 INPUT chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.6 FORWARD chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.7 OUTPUT chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.8 POSTROUTING chain
#
 

XXIX-D. Example rc.DHCP.firewall script

 
Sélectionnez
#!/bin/sh
#
# rc.DHCP.firewall - DHCP IP Firewall script for Linux 2.4.x and iptables
#
# Copyright (C) 2001  Oskar Andreasson <bluefluxATkoffeinDOTnet>
#
# This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation; version 2 of the License.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program or from the site that you downloaded it
# from; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple
# Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307   USA
#
 
###########################################################################
#
# 1. Configuration options.
#
 
#
# 1.1 Internet Configuration.
#
 
INET_IFACE="eth0"
 
#
# 1.1.1 DHCP
#
 
#
# Information pertaining to DHCP over the Internet, if needed.
#
# Set DHCP variable to no if you don't get IP from DHCP. If you get DHCP
# over the Internet set this variable to yes, and set up the proper IP
# address for the DHCP server in the DHCP_SERVER variable.
#
 
DHCP="no"
DHCP_SERVER="195.22.90.65"
 
#
# 1.1.2 PPPoE
#
 
# Configuration options pertaining to PPPoE.
#
# If you have problem with your PPPoE connection, such as large mails not
# getting through while small mail get through properly etc, you may set
# this option to "yes" which may fix the problem. This option will set a
# rule in the PREROUTING chain of the mangle table which will clamp
# (resize) all routed packets to PMTU (Path Maximum Transmit Unit).
#
# Note that it is better to set this up in the PPPoE package itself, since
# the PPPoE configuration option will give less overhead.
#
 
PPPOE_PMTU="no"
 
#
# 1.2 Local Area Network configuration.
#
# your LAN's IP range and localhost IP. /24 means to only use the first 24
# bits of the 32 bit IP address. the same as netmask 255.255.255.0
#
 
LAN_IP="192.168.0.2"
LAN_IP_RANGE="192.168.0.0/16"
LAN_IFACE="eth1"
 
#
# 1.3 DMZ Configuration.
#
 
#
# 1.4 Localhost Configuration.
#
 
LO_IFACE="lo"
LO_IP="127.0.0.1"
 
#
# 1.5 IPTables Configuration.
#
 
IPTABLES="/usr/sbin/iptables"
 
#
# 1.6 Other Configuration.
#
 
###########################################################################
#
# 2. Module loading.
#
 
#
# Needed to initially load modules
#
 
/sbin/depmod -a
 
#
# 2.1 Required modules
#
 
/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack
/sbin/modprobe ip_tables
/sbin/modprobe iptable_filter
/sbin/modprobe iptable_mangle
/sbin/modprobe iptable_nat
/sbin/modprobe ipt_LOG
/sbin/modprobe ipt_limit
/sbin/modprobe ipt_MASQUERADE
 
#
# 2.2 Non-Required modules
#
 
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_owner
#/sbin/modprobe ipt_REJECT
#/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack_ftp
#/sbin/modprobe ip_conntrack_irc
#/sbin/modprobe ip_nat_ftp
#/sbin/modprobe ip_nat_irc
 
###########################################################################
#
# 3. /proc set up.
#
 
#
# 3.1 Required proc configuration
#
 
echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
 
#
# 3.2 Non-Required proc configuration
#
 
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/rp_filter
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/conf/all/proxy_arp
#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr
 
###########################################################################
#
# 4. rules set up.
#
 
######
# 4.1 Filter table
#
 
#
# 4.1.1 Set policies
#
 
$IPTABLES -P INPUT DROP
$IPTABLES -P OUTPUT DROP
$IPTABLES -P FORWARD DROP
 
#
# 4.1.2 Create userspecified chains
#
 
#
# Create chain for bad tcp packets
#
 
$IPTABLES -N bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Create separate chains for ICMP, TCP and UDP to traverse
#
 
$IPTABLES -N allowed
$IPTABLES -N tcp_packets
$IPTABLES -N udp_packets
$IPTABLES -N icmp_packets
 
#
# 4.1.3 Create content in userspecified chains
#
 
#
# bad_tcp_packets chain
#
 
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,ACK SYN,ACK \
-m state --state NEW -j REJECT --reject-with tcp-reset
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp ! --syn -m state --state NEW -j LOG \
--log-prefix "New not syn:"
$IPTABLES -A bad_tcp_packets -p tcp ! --syn -m state --state NEW -j DROP
 
#
# allowed chain
#
 
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP --syn -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A allowed -p TCP -j DROP
 
#
# TCP rules
#
 
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 21 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 22 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 80 -j allowed
$IPTABLES -A tcp_packets -p TCP -s 0/0 --dport 113 -j allowed
 
#
# UDP ports
#
 
$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --source-port 53 -j ACCEPT
if [ $DHCP == "yes" ] ; then
 $IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s $DHCP_SERVER --sport 67 \
 --dport 68 -j ACCEPT
fi
 
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --source-port 53 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --source-port 123 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --source-port 2074 -j ACCEPT
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -s 0/0 --source-port 4000 -j ACCEPT
 
#
# In Microsoft Networks you will be swamped by broadcasts. These lines
# will prevent them from showing up in the logs.
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE \
#--destination-port 135:139 -j DROP
 
#
# If we get DHCP requests from the Outside of our network, our logs will
# be swamped as well. This rule will block them from getting logged.
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A udp_packets -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -d 255.255.255.255 \
#--destination-port 67:68 -j DROP
 
#
# ICMP rules
#
 
$IPTABLES -A icmp_packets -p ICMP -s 0/0 --icmp-type 8 -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A icmp_packets -p ICMP -s 0/0 --icmp-type 11 -j ACCEPT
 
#
# 4.1.4 INPUT chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Rules for special networks not part of the Internet
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LAN_IFACE -s $LAN_IP_RANGE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $LO_IFACE -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Special rule for DHCP requests from LAN, which are not caught properly 
# otherwise.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p UDP -i $LAN_IFACE --dport 67 --sport 68 -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Rules for incoming packets from the internet.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ALL -i $INET_IFACE -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED \
-j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p TCP -i $INET_IFACE -j tcp_packets
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p UDP -i $INET_IFACE -j udp_packets
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -p ICMP -i $INET_IFACE -j icmp_packets
 
#
# If you have a Microsoft Network on the outside of your firewall, you may
# also get flooded by Multicasts. We drop them so we do not get flooded by
# logs
#
 
#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $INET_IFACE -d 224.0.0.0/8 -j DROP
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A INPUT -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT INPUT packet died: "
 
#
# 4.1.5 FORWARD chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Accept the packets we actually want to forward
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $LAN_IFACE -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT FORWARD packet died: "
 
#
# 4.1.6 OUTPUT chain
#
 
#
# Bad TCP packets we don't want.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p tcp -j bad_tcp_packets
 
#
# Special OUTPUT rules to decide which IP's to allow.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $LO_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -s $LAN_IP -j ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -p ALL -o $INET_IFACE -j ACCEPT
 
#
# Log weird packets that don't match the above.
#
 
$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -m limit --limit 3/minute --limit-burst 3 -j LOG \
--log-level DEBUG --log-prefix "IPT OUTPUT packet died: "
 
######
# 4.2 nat table
#
 
#
# 4.2.1 Set policies
#
 
#
# 4.2.2 Create user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.2.3 Create content in user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.2.4 PREROUTING chain
#
 
#
# 4.2.5 POSTROUTING chain
#
 
if [ $PPPOE_PMTU == "yes" ] ; then
 $IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,RST SYN \
 -j TCPMSS --clamp-mss-to-pmtu
fi
$IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $INET_IFACE -j MASQUERADE
 
#
# 4.2.6 OUTPUT chain
#
 
######
# 4.3 mangle table
#
 
#
# 4.3.1 Set policies
#
 
#
# 4.3.2 Create user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.3.3 Create content in user specified chains
#
 
#
# 4.3.4 PREROUTING chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.5 INPUT chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.6 FORWARD chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.7 OUTPUT chain
#
 
#
# 4.3.8 POSTROUTING chain
#

XXIX-E. Example rc.flush-iptables script

 
Sélectionnez
#!/bin/sh
# 
# rc.flush-iptables - Resets iptables to default values. 
# 
# Copyright (C) 2001  Oskar Andreasson <bluefluxATkoffeinDOTnet>
#
# This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation; version 2 of the License.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program or from the site that you downloaded it
# from; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple
# Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307   USA
 
#
# Configurations
#
IPTABLES="/usr/sbin/iptables"
 
#
# reset the default policies in the filter table.
#
$IPTABLES -P INPUT ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -P FORWARD ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -P OUTPUT ACCEPT
 
#
# reset the default policies in the nat table.
#
$IPTABLES -t nat -P PREROUTING ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -t nat -P POSTROUTING ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -t nat -P OUTPUT ACCEPT
 
#
# reset the default policies in the mangle table.
#
$IPTABLES -t mangle -P PREROUTING ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -t mangle -P POSTROUTING ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -t mangle -P INPUT ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -t mangle -P OUTPUT ACCEPT
$IPTABLES -t mangle -P FORWARD ACCEPT
 
#
# flush all the rules in the filter and nat tables.
#
$IPTABLES -F
$IPTABLES -t nat -F
$IPTABLES -t mangle -F
#
# erase all chains that's not default in filter and nat table.
#
$IPTABLES -X
$IPTABLES -t nat -X
$IPTABLES -t mangle -X

XXIX-F. Example rc.test-iptables script

 
Sélectionnez
#!/bin/bash
#
# rc.test-iptables - test script for iptables chains and tables.
#
# Copyright (C) 2001  Oskar Andreasson <bluefluxATkoffeinDOTnet>
#
# This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation; version 2 of the License.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program or from the site that you downloaded it
# from; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple
# Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307   USA
#
 
#
# Filter table, all chains
#
iptables -t filter -A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request \
-j LOG --log-prefix="filter INPUT:"
iptables -t filter -A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply \
-j LOG --log-prefix="filter INPUT:"
iptables -t filter -A OUTPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request \
-j LOG --log-prefix="filter OUTPUT:"
iptables -t filter -A OUTPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply \
-j LOG --log-prefix="filter OUTPUT:"
iptables -t filter -A FORWARD -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request \
-j LOG --log-prefix="filter FORWARD:"
iptables -t filter -A FORWARD -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply \
-j LOG --log-prefix="filter FORWARD:"
 
#
# NAT table, all chains except OUTPUT which don't work.
#
iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request \
-j LOG --log-prefix="nat PREROUTING:"
iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply \
-j LOG --log-prefix="nat PREROUTING:"
iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request \
-j LOG --log-prefix="nat POSTROUTING:"
iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply \
-j LOG --log-prefix="nat POSTROUTING:"
iptables -t nat -A OUTPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request \
-j LOG --log-prefix="nat OUTPUT:"
iptables -t nat -A OUTPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply \
-j LOG --log-prefix="nat OUTPUT:"
 
#
# Mangle table, all chains
#
iptables -t mangle -A PREROUTING -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request \
-j LOG --log-prefix="mangle PREROUTING:"
iptables -t mangle -A PREROUTING -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply \
-j LOG --log-prefix="mangle PREROUTING:"
iptables -t mangle -I FORWARD 1 -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request \
-j LOG --log-prefix="mangle FORWARD:"
iptables -t mangle -I FORWARD 1 -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply \
-j LOG --log-prefix="mangle FORWARD:"
iptables -t mangle -I INPUT 1 -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request \
-j LOG --log-prefix="mangle INPUT:"
iptables -t mangle -I INPUT 1 -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply \
-j LOG --log-prefix="mangle INPUT:"
iptables -t mangle -A OUTPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request \
-j LOG --log-prefix="mangle OUTPUT:"
iptables -t mangle -A OUTPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply \
-j LOG --log-prefix="mangle OUTPUT:"
iptables -t mangle -I POSTROUTING 1 -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request \
-j LOG --log-prefix="mangle POSTROUTING:"
iptables -t mangle -I POSTROUTING 1 -p icmp --icmp-type echo-reply \
-j LOG --log-prefix="mangle POSTROUTING:"
 

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La permission est accordée de copier, distribuer et/ou modifier ce document selon les termes de la "GNU Free Ducomentation License", version 1.1; en précisant les sections "Introduction" et toutes les sous-sections, avec les en-têtes "Auteur: Oskar Andreasson".